Tag Archives: craig calcaterra

Clown shoes in Chicago: the Cubs grounds crew couldn’t get the tarp on the field

garlicfriesandbaseball:

Ronni’s Comment: Yesterday during the Cubs -Giants game there was a torrential downpour. I mean the kind that monsoons are made of. It lasted probably 15-20 minutes. But when the grounds crew tried to put the tarp on the field it turned into a nightmare for the guys pulling the tarp for sure, but also for the Giants fans and, in particular, for Mike Krukow, commentator for the Giants

I’m not sure I agree with the official ruling, but Mike Krukow commented several times during the rain delay stating in his words to the effect that the field crew “intentionally” screwed up the laying of the tarp. That it was totally intentional. That it wouldn’t have happened if the Cubs had been behind.

And I say shame on you Mike Krukow. You know better. Just because the Giants have won a few championships doesn’t give us the right to belittle others. We (the Giants) have been playing pretty lousy lately but that’s not a reason to take it out on the grounds crews or the umpires.

I’ve heard other commentators say similar things when I’ve had to listen to them from the opponent’s perspective and I’ve always been glad we were blessed with our own special Kruk & Kuip. They are a class act, top of the game, and they know everything! So I’m hoping this was just a bad day for Mike and I’m hoping he’s hoping it doesn’t happen again. But that’s just me hoping.

I can’t wait to hear what they have to say tonight, about last night, and praying it doesn’t rain again!

Originally posted on HardballTalk:

[nbcsports_video src=http://vplayer.nbcsports.com/p/BxmELC/nbcsportsembed/select/qchJ9Dm6PtkJ?autoPlay=false width=620 height=381]

The rains came. The rains lasted only fifteen minutes. The Chicago Cubs grounds crew, however, failed to do the one job it had in that situation:

The tarp was all crooked and so much of the field was left uncovered by it turing the downpour, that the infield was basically soaked. They took over four hours after the rain stopped to try to fix things, but it couldn’t be fixed. The field was too wet to play and the game — already official under the rules — was called. The Cubs win 2-0.

Not that this will end things. As Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com reports, the Giants are mulling a protest. For their part, the Cubs were willing to simply agree to call it a suspended, rather than an official game, but they can’t just do that because the rules don’t allow for it. Rule 4.12…

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Applying government shutdown logic to the baseball playoffs

garlicfriesandbaseball:

GFBB Comment:

Here’s the response courtesy of Fox Sports.com by Sam Gardner. It reads:

Dear Mr. Kaplan,

Thank you very much for your letter regarding the potential demise of baseball. Some have suggested it was a rhetorical squeeze play or a hit and run since the letter was posted online before it was actually mailed to me. Of course, it could be languishing in the post office. Sometimes, it’s hard to know when the mail service is open or closed.

I agree with you that Republicans and the Braves have much in common. You could say that the Republicans “Bravely” take on tough issues such as defunding Obamacare and trying to curtail runaway spending. And we don’t mind clearing the dugout for a good brawl. We also agree that Dodgers is a fitting name for the Democrats as they often “Dodge” serious issues such as balancing the budget or cutting spending.

Where we disagree is the game itself. If Uribe had decent bunting skills, he would have simply tied the score. Thus, the game would have continued. In such a situation, neither the Dodgers nor the Braves would have walked off the field crying “I will not ‘negotiate’ or, in this case, bat.” No, they would have stayed engaged and slugged it out. But, alas, Uribe can’t bunt — so game over.

On the bright side, winning the pennant doesn’t guarantee world peace. In fact, there are other glimmers of hope in the universe. Did you see the UGA-Tennessee game? Obviously, there is a God in Heaven. Or as we say in Athens: How ‘bout them Dawgs?

Sincerely,

Jack Kingston
Member of Congress

Related articles

Originally posted on HardballTalk:

Braves fan Paul Kaplan was quite upset that the Braves lost in the NLDS last night. So upset that he wrote his congressman about it.

I have to say, I never would have considered this, but if this logic applies in baseball, I may very well be willing to reassess how I feel about it when it comes to government.

source:

source:

(thanks to reader David L. for the heads up)

UPDATE: The Congressman responds!

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Remember when Yasiel Puig was gonna cost the Dodgers a playoff game with his recklessness?

garlicfriesandbaseball:

GFBB Comment: Loved this post by Craig Calcaterra. I was one of those naysayers, but he hit the nail on the head. I think Puig’s going to be one of those love em or hate em guys. And right now I’m sorta loving him. After that great base running performance last night I kept waiting for him to do something stupid, like sticking his tongue out at the opposing bench, but he refrained and I’m glad. Hang in there Dodger fans. Only a month or so to go!

Originally posted on HardballTalk:

Last night, Yasiel Puig’s smart, heads-up base running got the Dodgers a run. His arm in right — and the manner in which he kinda deked Even Gattis as to whether he was gonna catch a ball and then throw — ended the Braves second inning when he doubled Gattis off first. It was quite a playoff debut for the Dodgers rookie.

Which makes it a perfect time to go down the memory hole. Specifically, back to August, when Yasiel Puig was supposed to be unsafe at any speed and was going to cost the Dodgers playoff games with his lack of discipline and unprofessionalism. First, Bill Plaschke:

Puig’s antics are the sort that will cost a team in a close game in October. For every playoff game that Puig wins with his bold arm or crazy legs, he could cost them two.

Then Jon Morosi:

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Bacon Shelled Taco ~ Ultimate Ballpark Food? You Decide …..

Bacon Shell Taco

Bacon Shell Taco

That’s right folks!  The newest ballpark food just won a competition beating out “The Bad Joke”, a corn dog covered in cheese with two strips of duck bacon on a bun.   I found this AP article  posted by Craig Calcaterra on HardBall Talk .  Previous winners of the food contest include Chicks with Sticks and the Declaration of Indigestion. They’ve since been retired from the menu.  I wonder how long this one will last? 

Chocolate Covered Bacon

Chocolate Covered Bacon

Okay, I know.  I’m making fun of it, but to be honest I’m heading to the kitchen to duplicate it.  Here at the coastal resort town of Santa Cruz one of the favorites is “chocolate covered bacon” and “candied bacon chocolate chip cookies” run a close second.  Looks pretty darn good from here! 

So all I can say is,  Bacon lovers everywhere ~ unite!  And don’t knock it until you’ve tried it.  I  mean, really, isn’t everything better with bacon on it? 

Read the entire article from The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130314/LIFESTYLE05/303140427#ixzz2NY0gIaLH

garlicfriesandbaseball:

scales of justice 2GFBB Note: Craig Calcaterra who penned this post is a lawyer and has some really interesting comments on this case. Example: “…..the fact is, Bonds was asked a yes or no question and he answered “no.   And ” It is not the job of the criminal justice system to punish an evasive or non-responsive witness”.  If you’ve been following this case you’ll like this article.

Originally posted on HardballTalk:

Barry Bonds lawyers will head into court today to argue his appeal of his obstruction of justice conviction today. There will be no decision today because that’s not how appellate courts roll, but when you read the Bonds headlines later, that’s what it’s about.

To review: Bonds was acquitted on all counts of perjury, but convicted for obstruction of justice. The basis for that conviction: a rambling answer to a question about whether anyone besides team doctors ever injected him with anything. His initial answer was something incoherent about being a “celebrity child.” Prosecutors and the jury say that that answer was “intentionally false, misleading and evasive.”

What no one ever seems to mention, though, is that Bonds actually answered the question:

source:

 

As I’ve said before: maybe that “no” is lie. Probably is in fact. But the jury didn’t agree, acquitting him on that very question with respect to the perjury…

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Is Derek Jeter Washed up?

Jeter’s Split-Second Timing

I’ve been on vacation this past week and have been frothing at the bit to get back  to baseball!  I’ve been hearing bits and pieces about Felix Hernandez’ perfect game and Melky Cabreras’s not so perfect choices and wanting to get back into the nitty-gritty.  But today I landed on Craig Calcaterra’s article about Skip Bayless article about Derek Jeter…..fun stuff!

Here’s the article from Calcaterra.  Be sure and click on the link to  Bayless’ video.  If nothing else, it’s certainly entertaining!   We’ll save Felix and Melky for another day when I get back home to my own turf and can put some thought into the process.  Hope you’re all having a great summer!

A Light in the Eyes of a Giant ~ No Laughing Matter.

During the seventh inning of a Cardinals-Giants game on Monday,  a fan was arrested for shining a laser beam at Giants’ pitcher, Shane Loux .  I was watching the game on the tube and the announcers talked about the delay, but no one really knew what was going on, and eventually the game resumed.  As it turns out, the fan was a 17-year-old teenager who was with  some friends in an expensive private suite  along the first base line and maybe thought he was just having a little fun. 

“Craig Calcaterra’s Cat?”

My story’s not about the 17-year-old mis-guided laser-pointing fan.  It’s about a follow-up blog written by Craig Calcaterra on NBC’s HardBall.  The post shows a supposedly comical picture of a cat wanting to catch that “red dot”.  In the article Calcaterra says he sure hopes it’s not illegal to use those things or else he’ll have way less fun with his cat, making light of what could have been a really serious situation. 

My immediate concern was for the pitcher ~ that he could be blinded by the laser and throw a wild pitch,  injuring the batter, catcher or umpire.  When you consider the speed of some of those pitches, upwards to 100 mph, you have a potentially deady combination.  And that can be true even with perfect conditions, which doesn’t include having a laser flashed in your eye.  

But according to a Cardinals’ security spokesman there are other situations that need to be considered.  With laser-pointing, there is no way to distinguish a prank from a gunman aiming a laser-equipped firearm.  Joe Walsh, Director of Cardinals’ Security puts it this way, “… when you go into what’s been going on in the country right now, it’s totally irresponsible to pretend you’ve got laser sights on somebody”. 

The details of the incident are linked here, in a well-written article for the Post-Dispatch by Christine Byers of STL Today.com, and no matter how you want to spin the story, it’s no laughing matter.  

I sure don’t want Calcaterra to miss out on any fun with his cat, but hope he has the common sense to leave those things at home when he ventures out to the ballpark and other public places.

Baseball vs Football. An Unbiased Opinion …..

Oh okay, maybe the opinion isn’t exactly unbiased, but there are reasons.   Back in August, 2010 I wrote a blog titled “Gimme a Break.  Is this Baseball Season or Not?” about football taking the sports pages hostage every year two months before baseball season ended.

The blog included a delightful George Carlin video which I’ll repeat here, because it’s good enough to show  again in case you missed it.  

The reason I’m bringing this up again is Jim Caple, Sr Writer for ESPN.Com wrote a great article yesterday about”why baseball is better than football.  Craig Calcaterra of NBC Sports Online recommended it, saying it explains why, quote “baseball beats the crap out of football”, unquote.

Anyhow take a look at Caple’s article, linked above, and see what you think.  It’s not that we die-hard baseball fans need reminding, it’s just always nice to see that others agree with our unbiased opinions, don’t you think?

Locker Room Interviews ….. a Waste of Time?

I read and review hundreds of sports reports and baseball blogs every month and once in a while a story resonates with me so much I’m compelled to share it.    Today has one of those stories and it’s about those pesky locker room interviews after the game where microphones are shoved in the players faces and reporters are yelling … what, I don’t know, because I can never hear the question … and the players are trying to be calm and cool, giving respectable answers that will satisfy the coaches, management and rest of the team.  

I’ve rarely heard a question asked that I thought was important or even remotely entertaining. “How did you feel, what did you think” ….. adds nothing to the insight of the game.  I’d like to know what it was the umpire said to you that made you laugh out loud after a play, or what it was you yelled at the pitcher after being nailed by a pitch for the second time this game.  Craig Calcaterra at NBC Sports had some insight into this very thing in his blog this morning and almost as fun as the article are the comments that readers shared.   Here’s the article: 

Over at the Wall Street Journal today Craig Wolff writes about something I’ve been thinking about for a long time: what purpose, exactly, does it serve to have reporters in the locker room before and after games? Read the thinking-it-through parts of it all, which are good, but here’s the central question I think:

In the end, no matter what becomes of this American tradition, it’s probably time to start asking if all this standing around amounts to loitering and is worth the strain it puts on the relationship between press and players. It’s not clear that either side derives much from the transaction.

It used to be that the teams needed the local paper for publicity and stuff. That’s way less necessary now than it used to be, and in fact, the situation has reversed, with papers needing the team way more for circulation purposes.  But are the postgame quotes all that useful to the reader?  Wouldn’t the reporter’s face time be better spent trying to talk to athletes about more in-depth matters in feature stories?  Shouldn’t their gameday focus be more on the game itself, with their own analysis and insight — which in the case of most reporters is considerable because they’ve seen a lot of baseball — rather than transcribing the cliches?

Mark Feinsand of the Daily News is quoted in the article talking about how being in the locker room, despite the bad, empty quotes, is important for maintaining relationships, the sorts of which no doubt would lead to better feature stories like I’d like to see.  I get that.  It just seems to me that there’s gotta be a better way.”

 

MLB Bans Jim Joyce from Calling Galarraga Games!

I wrote a post last June entitled “Umpire ~ Toughest Job in Baseball“.   It was about the call Jim Joyce made on an Armando Galarraga throw to first that cost the pitcher the “perfect game”.   So when I read Craig Calcaterra’s headlines today I thought of the many games Joyce has called in the past year where Galarraga  has played and the games went without a hitch ~ smooth as silk. 

Today is the first anniversary of that infamous call and I have to say this made for a great headline!   It seems that the umpire and pitcher have entered a business venture and co-authored a book together.    The name of the book is “Nobody’s Perfect” . It was published last month and is available on Amazon

Some of the comments on Calcaterra’s blog this morning were pretty entertaining.   One mentioned an extreme dislike for a few of MLB’s umpires and suggested letting  every owner and GM in the game co-author a book and have their least favorite umpires write a chapter on the nuances of umpiring, country music, dieting, whatever, thereby eliminating them from umpiring “any” game.   After watching two really, really bad calls last night during the Cardinals-Giants game I understand what they’re saying.  Probably not a really good idea, but I get it.   Unfortunately the calls were made by two different umps so the blogger’s rationale isn’t very sound.  Eventually there wouldn’t be anyone left to call the games! 

Hmm…. you just know a movie about the two is in the works.   Wonder who’ll play Armando?   Better yet!  Who in the world could possibly play Jim Joyce?   I can see it now;  “And the award for best actor goes to ……… Jim Joyce for playing  ………. “Jim Joyce”! 

All in fun.  It’s great to see a friendly and working relationship between these two special men, and I hope the entire baseball community will embrace this as well.