Tag Archives: garlic fries and baseball

Baseball Reliquary you say? ……. What the ^&*(#$%

Annie Savoy in Bull Durham

Annie Savoy in Bull Durham

Whittier College is establishing the first “Baseball Reliquary” in the country and will be housed under the Religious Department, with a Professor of Religious Studies and everything.   When I read about this at, where else, “Hardball Talk”, the first thing I did was look up Reliquary, to find out it meant a shrine, or place for relics.  Curious huh?

The second thing that came to mind was Susan Sarandon’s role as Annie Savoy in “Bull Durham”.  And whether you’re a religious zealot or an atheist or somewhere in between, Annie’s  “I believe in the church of baseball” line will probably live forever;

“I believe in the Church of Baseball. I’ve tried all the major religions and most of the minor ones. I’ve worshipped Buddha, Allah, Brahma, Vishnu, Siva, trees, mushrooms and Isadora Duncan. I know things. For instance, there are 108 beads in a Catholic rosary and there are 108 stitches in a baseball. When I heard that, I gave Jesus a chance. But it just didn’t work out between us. ……………I’ve tried ’em all, I really have, and the only church that truly feeds the soul is the Church of Baseball.”

The third thing that came to mind was a memorable quote that I like so much I used it in my book, “Garlic Fries and Baseball”:

“There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem – once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit. ~ Al Gallagher, 1971”

Well, I get it. And I included an original poem in my book, “Dreams and Things” that explains how I get it, this baseball reliquary thing.  Just so you know that I know the poem’s a little corny and I’d like to clarify I wasn’t always like this.  But as I get a little older each year different things take on different meanings and I have to tell you, when I read how baseball’s popularity is fading, and it’s not long for this earth and it’s boring,  I know there are those who “don’t get it”.  It’s too bad, really, and right in the middle of the playoffs. Wouldn’t you know?

Here’s the last part of my poem:

“When in the end I realize,
The things that matter most in life,
Are those that bring fond memories
Of people, places, food and things,
Of God and family gatherings,
And Casey at the Bat.”

If there’s any way I could possibly justify taking that course at Whittier I’d do it in a New York minute!  Baseball reliquary you say?  Get in line folks ~this class is gonna fill up fast!

 

 

 

 

 

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Bud Selig can’t remember the last domestic violence incident in Major League Baseball

Ronni’s Note: But just because Bud Selig doesn’t remember an incident doesn’t mean it isn’t happening. The law of averages says it is. Maybe it just isn’t getting reported. But what’s going on over at the NFL? Reporting of it’s becoming epidemic and that’s a good thing, but can’t somebody get a handle on this? Condi, where are you?

HardballTalk

Bud Selig was asked yesterday about the Ray Rice situation and Major League Baseball’s approach to domestic violence. He mentioned that, in the past, having a league policy on domestic violence had been discussed but tabled in favor of these things being handled on a case-by-case basis. He also said this:

“We haven’t had any cases I’m happy to say for a long, long time. I can’t remember when the last time was,” Selig said. “I’m grateful for that. But we deal with situations as they occur. The only thing I want to say, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, we are a social institution and I’m proud of our record in dealing with a myriad of subjects, and we deal with them, I think, quite effectively.”

Maybe I’m missing one that is more recent, but a quick check of HBT posts shows that Everth Cabrera was…

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Yasiel Puig flipped his bat on a walk, almost took out the catcher and umpire

Ronni’s Comment:Well this helped lift my spirits a little after last night’s Giant vs Rockies fiasco. You can always count on the Dodger’s Yasiel Puig for entertainment, one way or another.

HardballTalk

Even Vin Scully called this “ridiculous.” And not in that good, “redonkulous” sense. More in the “Jeez, kid, shape up, will ya?” sense.

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This day in Baseball History………Hazard at the Ballpark!

August 4, 1983.

  • 1983 – While warming up before the fifth inning of the Yankees 3-1 win over the  

    Dave Winfield

     

    Blue Jays game at Toronto’s Exhibition Stadium, New York outfielder Dave Winfield accidentally kills a seagull with a thrown ball. After the game, Winfield is brought to the Ontario Provincial Police station on charges of cruelty to animals and is forced to post a $500 bond before being released. The charges will be dropped the following day.

  • Imagine.   You’ve played 4 innings of an otherwise uneventful ballgame and are warming up for the 5th.    After throwing the ball around the field, you lob it into the catcher to start the next inning, and BAM!!!   A seagull flies right into the darn thing, falls dead to the ground, and you’re hauled off to the police department to face charges.  That’s one you won’t forget!   And this is kinda sorta before the nutcases surface that are trying to protect the tutsigz ant from forever being extinct.   I thought this little ditty was so intriguing it sent me to the baseball archives to see what other oddities and potential hazards might be lurking out there

    A few years ago a fan was cheering for her local baseball team, sitting close to the dugout.   She took a look at the score board and “boom” it hit her!   A foul ball slammed into her face, ripping her lip, shattering her teeth and fracturing her palate.   This type of thing doesn’t happen very often, but more often than you’d think.  Usually it says on your ticket that liability is very limited.   Recently we had seats right behind left field.  I spent an entire week-end trying to dig up an old mitt, knowing we’d be sitting in “home run territory”.  As it was, the guy next to us spent most of the game at the beer stand and asked me to take care of his mitt.   No home runs our way this time but you just never know.

    On March 25,2001, during the 7th inning of a Diamondback/Giants game, Randy Johnson sent a

    Randy Johnson

     

    lethal pitch towards the catcher’s mitt, only to hit and kill a dove who flew in front of home plate at exactly the wrong time!  The pitch sent the bird over the catcher’s, Rod Barajas’, head and landed a few feet from the plate amid a sea of feathers.  He explained later he was waiting for the ball, expecting to catch it, and all he saw was an explosion, feathers flying everywhere.   The bird literally disintegrated.  Pundits mused because it was a bird it was a “fowl” ball.  Others commented the bird obviously wasn’t a baseball fan or he wouldn’t have flown within 5 feet of home plate – in any direction – when Johnson was pitching!   The official ruling from the umpire was “No Pitch” and play resumed.

    On a lighter note, The San Diego Chicken mascot appeared at a Chicago Bulls game (wrong sport!) back in January, 1991, and in his enthusiasm tackled a cheerleader (must have run out of pickup lines) and injured her.  She sued the chicken and was awarded $300,000 for her injuries.

    In July, 2000, the Florida mascot, Billy the Marlin, fired his trusty air-pressurized T-shirt Gun into the stands, accidentally hit an elderly male fan in the head, hitting him unconscious.  He recovered and, naturally, filed a lawsuit.

    On August 24, 1919, Cleveland pitcher Ray Caldwell is flattened by a bolt of lightning in his debut with the team. He recovers to get the final out of the game, and defeats Philadelphia, 2-1

    Going way back, August 24, 1886 – Just as he reaches the ball on a long hit by Jimmy Wolf, Reds center fielder Abner Powell’s pants are grabbed by a stray dog.  Wolf circles the bases with the homer that wins the game for Louisville 5-3 in eleven innings

     In 1998, the infamous Phillie Phanatic cost his team $2.5 million after he aggressively hugged a store employee at a grand opening.  Phillie is the most sued mascot in baseball history, known especially for flipping trays out of concession workers’ hands and causing grief  just about everywhere he appears in the stands.  

    Just remember, if you’re going to the ballpark, take a mitt, wear a motorcycle helmet or some other protective device,  stay alert and watch out for those dogs and birds!

    Today in history 1984 …..Pete Rose passes Ty Cobb’s single hits record.

    The record at that time was 3,053.   Pete Rose has a lot of major league records.   He’s the all time Major League leader in hits (4,256), in games played (3,562) in at-bats (14,053) and in outs (10,328).   Rose went on to hit another 162 singles and still holds that record of 3,215.  Pete Rose is one of baseball’s most controversial figures after publicly admitting in 2004 that he had bet on baseball and on his own team, the Cincinnati Reds. 

    On  August 31, 1989, after weeks of  legal wrangling, Commissioner Bart Giamatti permanently bans Pete Rose from baseball for his alleged gambling on major league games. Although the five-page document signed by both parties includes no formal findings, Giamatti says that he considers Rose’s acceptance of the ban to be a no-contest plea to the charges

    But here’s what’s interesting.   Rose played from 1963 to 1986.  That’s 24 years.  And these records plus others listed below still hold.   We’ve seen lots of talent in the past 50 years and still, Pete Rose holds all these records.  Think of baseball greats like Willie Mays, Ted Williams, Cal Ripken, Stan Musial, Mickey Mantle, Rickey Henderson, Carl Yazstremski, Ken Griffey, Brooks Rob inson, and on and on.   I guess that’s why I find this day in history interesting and just a little disturbing.   I’m thinking particularly of  Baseball’s Hall of Fame.  Take a look at the following records that Pete Rose holds today:

    Major League records:

      • Most career hits – 4,256
      • Most career outs – 10,328
      • Most career games played – 3,562
      • Most career at bats – 14,053
      • Most career singles – 3,215
      • Most career runs by a switch hitter – 2,165
      • Most career doubles by a switch hitter – 746
      • Most career walks by a switch hitter – 1,566
      • Most career total bases by a switch hitter – 5,752
      • Most seasons of 200 or more hits – 10
      • Most consecutive seasons of 100 or more hits – 23
      • Most consecutive seasons with 600 or more at bats – 13 (1968–1980)
      • Most seasons with 600 at bats – 17
      • Most seasons with 150 or more games played – 17
      • Most seasons with 100 or more games played – 23
      • Record for playing in the most winning games – 1,972
      • Only player in major league history to play more than 500 games at five different positions – 1B (939), LF (671), 3B (634), 2B (628), RF (595)
    • National League records:
    •  
      • Most years played – 24
      • Most consecutive years played – 24
      • Most career runs – 2,165
      • Most career doubles – 746
      • Most career games with 5 or more hits – 10
      • Modern (post-1900) record for longest consecutive game hitting streak – 44
      • Modern record for most consecutive hitting streaks of 20 or more games – 7

    The National Baseball Hall of Fame honors  persons who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport.  The Hall’s Motto:  “Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations”.    I don’t know about you, but I don’t think history’s meant to be “selective”.   I don’t have a problem with the asterisk crowd ~ oh, okay, go ahead and put an asterisk by the name and list what you want,  but for pete’s sake (no pun intended) list the accomplishments as accomplishments, and the small stuff  if you must.   But fame is fame and if the Hall of Fame is to be truly a Hall of Fame shouldn’t it  include those records and achievements that are so substantial they remain as unbeaten records 26 years later?

    Baltimore Orioles…..Finally! Something to cheer about.

    Geez, I know, it sounds kinda harsh.   And they may not be the worst team, but they sure have the worst record, by far the worst record.    I really like the Orioles.  I like everything about them.   They have one of the best ballparks, best ballpark food, and

    Oriole Park

    some of the friendliest fans on earth.  But honestly!   When we were there a few weeks ago they were playing the Washington Nationals who have one of the best rookies in the game this year.   So even though the Orioles can’t get anyone to turn out for their games,with the Nationals playing only 30 miles from their hometown, they should have had a sellout crowd, but they didn’t and I was embarrassed for them.

    So when I saw this video today, I totally understood it.  I guess it’s just that the fans in Baltimore don’t have a lot to cheer about!   I didn’t watch the game, but Minnesota beat them 5-0 last night and with the rousing cheers this guy was getting running around the field you can imagine the excitement threshold of the game was pretty lacking at least from an Oriole fan’s perspective.   One can only imagine what craziness might have ensued if he’d decided to streak……and in that Baltimore heat it wouldn’t have been a complete surprise! 

    Thanks for indulging me this morning.  I just returned from vacation and wanted to blog, but not about anything heavy.    Boy,  I sure lucked out huh?  I’m just trying to cut the poor Oriole fans a little slack for cheering on  bout the only thing they’ve had to cheer about this season.   It’s okay dudes!   We’ve all been there but thank you God, not this year!

    This Day in History ….. July 10, 1932

  • Connie Mack 1887

    “1932 – To save train fare for the single-date appearance, Connie Mack takes along just two A’s pitchers to Cleveland. Lew Krausse the A’s starting pitcher, gives up four hits in the first inning and his replacement, Eddie Rommel pitches 17 innings in relief, giving up a record 29 hits, but wins 18-17.  

    I had no idea whatsoever of blogging this morning.  Need to clean house after my 8 day baseball tour left things in a bit of shambles here, but this little ditty brought up all sorts of stuff that’s been on my mind anyhow so I wanted to share some of it with you.

  • The Giants are my home team and this is particularly relevant to them, but it’s going on everywhere lately and frankly I think the fans are getting a little tired and fed up with it.  Probably the pitchers are too.  It relates to a relief pitcher coming in and throwing

    Juan Marichael

    one or two pitches and the coach pulls him out – or worse, the starting pitcher throws a bad pitch inthe 4th or 5th inning  and is pulled out only to have the relief guy come in and walk the next three.  I was listening to a great interview with Bob Costas and Juan Marichal a few weeks ago and Juan talked about pitching 15 innings with a pitch count of over 227 pitches back in the 70’s.   The game was between the SF Giants and Milwaukee Braves and both Marichal and Warren Spahn pitched scoreless innings until the 16th when Willie Mays homered to end the game 1- 0.  Just this week the Giants took along a huge arsenal of pitchers on their road trip.   And at one point in one game they’d pretty much used them all, at least all the eligible ones.  Maybe the problem is they have to pay so much for a pitcher nowadays, they can’t afford to use him more than a couple pitches a game, at least the relief pitchers.  Or maybe they’re worried they won’t be able to get the job done.  Who knows.  But c’mon coach.  Get real.  For the amount of money these guys make, if the coach puts them in a game after 4-5 days off-time and they can’t even make it through one inning, how

    Dusty Baker 2002 World Series

    valuable are they to the team anyway?   Maybe the coaches (includes managers) should have a little more faith in their pitchers, both starters and relievers.    Remember in the 2002 World Series ….. with the Giants leading 5–3 going after the bottom of the 7th inning of Game 6?   Giants Manager Dusty Baker took pitcher Russ Ortiz out of the game and brought in relief pitcher Felix  Rodriguez who almost immediately gave up a 3 run homer to Scott Spiezio  for the Angels.  A win for the Giants would have given them the lead in the Series.   Instead, Anaheim went on to win the game 6-5 and eventually the 2002 World Series.   To this day I can hardly look at Dusty Baker without feeling he was trying to throw the game.  Probably a little reactionary on my part,  but that’s how I feel.  When I read about Eddie Rommel this day in history it brings back all those gut feelings of maybe, just maybe, the managers and coaches should be trusting our pitchers a little more.  Isn’t that after all what they’re getting paid to do?   If they don’t trust them to get the job done, what are they doing there in the first place?    Just one person’s opinion after sitting through

    Scott Spiezio

    too many games watching the pitcher get yanked before he gets  a chance to finish the job he’s hired to do.   At least that’s the way I see it.   Okay, back to cleaning the house! 

    Here’s a synopsis of that infamous Game 6 Saturday, October 26, 2002 at Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

    Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
    San Francisco 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 5 8 1
    Anaheim 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 X 6 10 1

    WP: Brendan Donnelly (1–0)  LP: Tim Worrell (1–1)  SV: Troy Percival (2)  
    HRs:  SF – Shawon Dunston (1), Barry Bonds (4)  ANA – Scott Spiezio (1), Darin Erstad (1)