Tag Archives: History

Ethics Hero: American League Batting Champion Jose Altuve

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros

Jose Altuve, Houston Astros

Ethics and sportsmanship. Two of my favorite topics and my favorite blog dealing with the subject is “Ethics Alarms”. This isn’t a baseball blog, or even a sports blog for that matter, but I find myself quoting it often and I’m always able to learn from it. In this blog he talks about doing the right thing and what interested me most was, even if he hadn’t done the right thing, most fans would never have noticed. Chalk one up for another great article from Ethics Alarms’ Jack Marshall, ethicist, lawyer, and the president of ProEthics, Ltd., trying to keep us on the straight and narrow and reminding us there still is such a thing.

Ethics Alarms

Altuve

There was another baseball Ethics Hero who emerged on the last day of the regular season yesterday. File it under “Sportsmanship.”

Houston Astros secondbaseman  Jose Altuve (at less than 5′ 5″, the shortest athlete in a major professional sport) began the day hitting .340, three points ahead of the Tigers’ Victor Martinez, who was at .337. Even with all the new stats and metrics showing that batting average alone is not the best measure of a baseball player’s offensive value, a league batting championship remains the most prestigious of individual titles, putting a player in the record books with the likes of Ty Cobb, Ted Williams, Rogers Hornsby, George Brett, Ichiro Suzuki and Tony Gwynn. It’s still a big deal. If Altuve didn’t play in Houston’s meaningless last game, Martinez would have to go 3-for-3 to pass him, giving the DH a narrow .3407 average compared with Altuve’s .3399. By…

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A Few Baseball Oddities ~ Statistically Speaking

Nolan Ryan & Robin Ventura's friendly encounter after Ventura charged the mound. Photo Courtesy of Google Images.

Here’s a great post I found this morning from one of our GFBB’s Recommended Websites, William Miller’s “The On Deck Circle” .   Bill tends to write rather lengthy articles  so I’m posting a portion to peak your interest.  The complete article is linked  below.  It’s about the pitchers deemed the hardest to hit in all of baseball and includes some of the best and worst in other positions.  I think you’ll enjoy this.

February 6, 2012   William Miller’s  “On Deck Circle”

BASEBALL STATISTICAL ODDITIES

Every once in a while, as I’m doing some research for this blog, I’ll come across a baseball statistic that catches me off guard.

I’m not suggesting that no one else has ever noticed any of these odd items before, but if they are new to me, they might just be new to you, too.

To begin with, which particular pitchers in baseball history do you think were the toughest to hit against (Hits / 9 Innings)?

Did you say Walter Johnson?  Well, O.K., he is 33rd on the all-time list having given up 7.47 hits per nine innings in his career.  Randy Johnson?  You’re getting warmer.  He is 22nd on the list.

Remember, we are not talking about WHIP here.  Just hits per nine.

Yes, of course, it was Nolan Ryan.  He was the Number #1 toughest pitcher to hit, having given up just 6.55 hits per nine.  Not a surprise.  But keep reading.  (Click here to continue reading the complete article from Bill Miller’s The On Deck Circle.)

Veterans Day and Every Day ….. Thank You!

Note:  This is a repost of my 2010 Veteran’s Day Blog.

Arlington National Cemetery

“But the mainstay of the big leagues was the reservoir of 4-Fs – males of draft age who had been rejected on physical grounds by the Armed Forces. Not since harem attendants had gone out of style were men’s physical deficiencies so highly prized. Ulcers, hearing defects, and torn cartilages were coveted by team owners.” – Frank Graham, Jr. in Farewell to Heroes (1981)

This and the following list of Hall of Fame Members Courtesy of  Baseball Almanac.

Baseball Hall of Fame Members  who Served in the Armed Forces.
The Civil War  
Morgan Bulkeley United States Army
World War I
Grover Alexander  United States Army
Happy Chandler United States Army Continue reading

Guess who’s following us on Twitter !

This is great!  I just received an email that Major League Baseball is now following this blog on Twitter!   It’s just pretty exciting to know our little blog is recognized to have at least some merit.  MLB follows less than 1% of the Blogs that follow them so I feel very lucky to have been chosen.  GFBB was started on May 10, 2010, and in it’s short life has received over 3,200 hits.   It has a regular following of baseball fans and for that I truly thank you!   It’s just a lot of fun and I hope it can go on for years.  Okay.  It’s midnight and I’m going to bed now.  Totally exhausted from watching the Giants and their 16-5 victory, and now this news from MLB ~  it’s just too much excitement for one night!   Thanks again.  Baseball fans are the greatest!   We’ll talk again soon :))