Tag Archives: seamheads.com

Hall of Fame Voting ~ Some Writers Don’t Deserve the Privilege

“Cooperstown Hall of Fame”

Interesting article yesterday at Seamheads.com,  written by John Baranowski.  It goes deep about the history and inner workings of who makes it to Cooperstown and why.  But what I found interesting is that all of the BBWAA writers can vote – even though some of them haven’t written on the subject for years.  He’s proposing that Announcers and Broadcasters be added to the list of those who can vote.  Thinking about the ones I listen to on a daily basis, it seems the most logical of logical ideas.  I mean, who knows more about the history of most all ballplayers than those who are talking about it and watching on a daily basis – some for the past half century.

Baranowski also casually mentions the idea that fans might  be given a shot at voting, noting they could probably do just as well as those who are currently voting. Personally, I hope that never happens.  Human nature being what it is, I fear a huge popularity contest.  Those cities with huge fan bases will be sending the most Hall of Fame Inductees and that’s not what it’s supposed to be about.  In my humble opinion, of course.

Baltimore Follies Forgiven ….. For Now

An Empty Oriole Stadium

An Empty Oriole Stadium

It took a  Seamheads.Com post by Terry Keshner this morning to get me back in the saddle.  I really miss posting, but have a lot on my plate for at least another week and my favorite thing to do has had to take a backseat.

Seamheads is a great baseball site, one of my favorites, so I sat up and took notice when the Baltimore Orioles/Chicago White Sox games took center stage when the games were closed to the fans these past few days.  “It had to be that way” the article said.

“It had to be that way”?  When the Europeans closed their stadiums it was directly related to the players and the fans. They were getting killed on game day at those stadiums.

This didn’t have to be that way. What did the attempt of some high school kids and community organizers trying to usurp the authority of legally empowered law enforcement officers have to do with closing the stadium?  Does the system need to be overhauled? Probably.  But by closing the stadium they denied workers, vendors, and fans their legal rights so now you don’t just have the kids and their enablers affected you’re also affecting 40,000 individuals who had nothing to do with the mess.

Maybe the regular security measures that accompany most stadiums on game day, along with National Guardsmen strategically placed around the stadium, inside and out, might have been a better alternative. Just one suggestion. And I’m sure there are many others that are better than the decision to close the stadium on game day.

But this is something we’ve not had to deal with in our country before and hopefully it will be the last, but don’t count on it.  The times-they-are-a-changing folks  and now’s the time to get our smarts in order so that decisions  for better strategies can be made in the future.

In my humble opinion, of course.

An Opening Day Treasure … From that Other Chicago Team.

U. S. Cellular Field

It’s been 11 years and I still want to refer to the White Sox ballpark as Comiskey rather than U. S. Cellular Field.  It’s ingrained in the soul as much as Fenway and Wrigley.  But, nonetheless, couldn’t pass up the opportunity to share a great read with you from this morning’s offerings.  Here’s an excerpt:

Irish Nachos

” I am of Irish descent and I have been to Ireland and let me just say that the old joke that one of the shortest books in the world is Great Irish Cooks is actually no joke at all.  But Irish Nachos defy those ugly slanders and ignominious legacy and leave you feeling happy, Gaelic, bloated and ready to burp all over the rest of the American League.  God Bless Baseball.”

Here’s the entire article written by Terry Keshner at Seamheads.com.

Chicago White Sox Opening Day:  Irish Nachos and Baroque Batter’s Box