Wow!  Matt Duffy can write.  I found this in my email box this morning and couldn’t wait to share it.  Please take time to read it.  We don’t often get to view the experience from the player’s point of view.  This one not only gives insight into our Duff Man, obvious choice for 2015 “Rookie of the Year”, but also into the Giants organization.

Take a look! “THE NEW KID”, Courtesy of “Player’s Tribune”.


To tell you the truth, I’m not really into hip-hop, heavy metal, alternative or other stuff such as “rap” but this video sort of fell into my lap last week and it  got my attention.

This one’s about Pete Rose and it’s definitely “rap”.  It’s written, performed and produced by PahlaJohnny and it has me mesmerized.   He generously contributed this work to our “Sounds of Baseball” website and it’s been getting some attention so I wanted to share it with you.

Be sure and check out his website,  And it’s not just baseball he’s into ~”Hoops India” section is a good one.  Over his career, he has designed live video streaming products for companies like Red Bull and ESPN, worked with Kenzo Digital on the NYC screening of City of Godson, launched Hoops India in Delhi and Mumbai.

I have to rethink this rap stuff.  Wonder if he has anything on MadBum & Posey?

They Deserve Better …….

An interesting article in “Reflections” this week by Steve Contursi.   He’s commenting on the emotions of  baseball player Wilmer Flores on being traded from the Mets, where he began his career, to Milwaukee, and the impact of trades throughout the industry.

Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki

I’m reminded of this as I listened to Troy Tulowitzki’s account of how he found out about being traded last week.  Tulo had an affinity for the National League and for all intents and purposes had asked to remain there. Instead they not only sent him to the AL, but out of the country to Toronto. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but he found out about it in the 9th inning of a game he was playing in, as they escorted him out the door.  Tulo surely deserved better than that.

Just another reminder that baseball is a business.  A huge business, subject to both the good and bad aspects of such and it probably won’t be changing anytime soon.  But it doesn’t stop the rest of us from empathizing with the guys.   After all, aren’t we helping to pay their salaries?     In a small sort of way don’t they really belong to all of us?   They deserve better, in my humble opinion, of course.

Hall of Fame Voting ~ Some Writers Don’t Deserve the Privilege

“Cooperstown Hall of Fame”

Interesting article yesterday at,  written by John Baranowski.  It goes deep about the history and inner workings of who makes it to Cooperstown and why.  But what I found interesting is that all of the BBWAA writers can vote – even though some of them haven’t written on the subject for years.  He’s proposing that Announcers and Broadcasters be added to the list of those who can vote.  Thinking about the ones I listen to on a daily basis, it seems the most logical of logical ideas.  I mean, who knows more about the history of most all ballplayers than those who are talking about it and watching on a daily basis – some for the past half century.

Baranowski also casually mentions the idea that fans might  be given a shot at voting, noting they could probably do just as well as those who are currently voting. Personally, I hope that never happens.  Human nature being what it is, I fear a huge popularity contest.  Those cities with huge fan bases will be sending the most Hall of Fame Inductees and that’s not what it’s supposed to be about.  In my humble opinion, of course.

Broken Bats, Barry Bonds and The Easy Way Out.

broken bat image

John Bowker, Giants vs Cardinals, April 18, 2008.

It takes a lot to get me back into blogging mode these days.  And it’s not because I don’t want to but, like everyone else, I’m busy.  So when I read an article in this morning’s Wall Street Journal I couldn’t contain myself.

The article was written by Jo Craven McGinty,  “Behind Broken Baseball Bats, Broken Records.”  Blame Barry, she says, and that got my attention.  Evidently the year that Bonds hit his record 73 home runs, he was using a maple wood bat, unlike the ash bats that were commonplace in the majors at the time.

Today the use of maple wood bats has increased to nearly 75% of all bats used in broken bat 2the major leagues.  There’s controversy about whether maple vs ash bats contribute to more home runs.    The problem is that maple is more likely to split into multiple pieces when it breaks, while ash “flakes”.   In other words, it can hurt people.  Like it did on June 5 at Fenway Park, when it smashed into the stands and into the face of a fan.

Kurt Ainsworth, Marucci Sports, puts it this way.  “When you have future Hall of Famers putting up crazy numbers, it’s hard for MLB to take those bats out of their hands.”  Really.  Is that what it means?  You mean Barry Bonds record home runs was due to his “bat” and had nothing to do with steroids?   According to Lloyd Smith, Director of the Sports Science Lab at Washington State University, “The speed of the ball coming off maple is no different from the speed of the ball coming off ash.”

But here’s the kicker.  According to McGinty’s article, which also deals with the diameter, density and slope of grain of the bats, regulations have reduced the number of broken bats.  “Since 2013 the minimum density of the barrel of the bat is 0.0245 pounds per cubic inch.  The Regulations have reduced the number of broken bats.”  But, as she notes, there are exceptions to the rules:

“Players who used low-density bats before the rules took effect are grandfathered in and at least 15% of maple bats used in MLB today have densities below 0.0245.”

Are you kidding me?  If there’s any substance to this regulation at all, why would you take the easy way out and let any of the players keep using the maple bats?

I’ll bet money on the fact someone out there has the answer.  And I hope it’s not because the guys who are hitting the homers are the ones who are still using those bats and drawing the fans through the gates.  I mean it can’t always be about the money, can it?

The Sounds (And Sights) Of Baseball


Here’s Steve Contursi doing what he does best for love of the game ~ again.

Thank you Steve!

Originally posted on REFLECTIONS ON BASEBALL:

In the 21st Century, we live in a video world. YouTube posts go viral and police wear “cop cams”. ……..If we can’t see it,  we don’t believe it or it simply didn’t happen.

But there is another way to explore and experience life…….seemingly long forgotten but once the only way we “knew” anything……….and that is by exercising our auditory senses.

Sounds Of Baseball is predicated on that concept. It is a not for profit website that is the work of Ronnie Redmond (Santa Cruz, CA) and myself.  Completely reworked by Ronnie, the new mobile friendly site offers a trip back to yesteryear when sound was all that existed. Here’s a sample…….

Ted Williams Last At Bat…………..tell me the radio announcer doesn’t draw you in to the moment with his radio call……..

We are (openly) trying to promote our site. Please consider posting or sending it to your friends on…

View original 11 more words

183 Day MLB Trip in 2015: Game 62 – Wrigley Field

Wow!   This is what I’d call a “real” summer vacation.  Have fun Chuck! We’ll be following your journey.

183 Day MLB Trip in 2015: Game 62 – Wrigley Field.